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14 Jan 2017, 1:52
Europe
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Baroque music in Valletta, Malta

La Valette, Malta

 Valetta, Malta

I was seduced by my visit to Valletta. One has to visit Malta to dive into a place, a universe where architecture can date from the prehistoric era, where the Romans lived as well as the Arabs, the French, the Knights of St. John and the British. It’s absolutely fantastic.

A major event on the international calendar, the Valletta festival brings baroque music to the fore in January, in a city where the melodious echoes of the 16th century still resonate. The masterful interpretation of renowned artists (Andrea Bocelli), the beauty and acoustics of prestigious concert venues such as the Manoel Theater, as well as the quality of the works presented, make this festival an inevitable rendez-vous for fans of the genre.

And one could not imagine a more beautiful setting to celebrate baroque music than the city of Valletta, which carries in it the quintessence of this flamboyant time. The Maltese capital as we can discover it today, built by the knight Jean Parisot of Valletta after the Great Siege of the island by the Ottomans in 1565, retains intact perfectly intact the charm and the architectural harmony of its creation.

Unesco’s World Heritage Site for its concentration of monuments from the 16th and 17th centuries, invites you to a wonderful dive in the heart of the rich and spectacular Baroque style.
You may locate in a very comfortable 5-star hotel at the gateway to the historic entrance of Valletta, you will go to meet this exciting city, while enjoying the festival thanks to these exceptional performances that will delight all music lovers. ..

 

 

La Valetta, Malta

 Valetta, Malta

 

Michelle Dufort.

 

16 Juin 2015, 3:07
Afrique/Africa
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Petra in Jordan

Royal Tomb

The ancient city of Petra is one of Jordan’s national treasures and by far its best known tourist attraction.  Located about three hours south of Amman by car or bus,, Petra is the legacy of the Nabataeans, an industrious Arab people who settled in southern Jordan more than 2 000 years ago. Admired then for its refined culture, massive architecture and ingenious complex of dams and water channels, Petra is now a UNESCO world heritage site that enchants visitors from all corners of the globe.

Although most of what can be seen at Petra today was built by the Nabataeans, the area is known to have been inhabitedfrom as early as 7,000 to 6,500 BC.  Evidence of an early settlement from this period can still be seen today at Little Petra, just north of the main Petra site. Where it is not so easy to go. A long walk is needed.
By the Iron Age (1,200 to 539 BC), Petra was inhabited by the Edomites who settled mainly on the hills around Petra rather than the actual site chosen by the Nabataeans. Although the
Edomites were not proficient at stone masonry, they excelled at making pottery and it seems they passed this craft on to the Nabataeans. A recently excavated kiln discovered at Wadi
Musa, indicates that Petra was a regional centre for potteryproduction up until the late 3rd century AD, after which it fell into decline.

The Nabataeans were a nomadic Arab people from Arabia who began to arrive and slowly settle in Petra at the end of the 6th
century BC. It seems their arrival at Petra was unplanned, as their original intent was to migrate to southern Palestine.  No
doubt they found this place attractive with its plentiful supply of water,  defensive canyon walls and the friendly Edomites,
with whom it seems they had a peaceful coexistence.
By the 2nd century BC, Petra had become a huge city encompassing around ten square kilometres, and was the capital of the Nabataean Kingdom. Primarily, the Nabataeans were farmers. They cultivated vines and olive trees and bred camels, sheep, goats and horses.
They were skilled at water management and built a complex network of channels and cisterns to bring water from a plentiful source at Ain Musa several kilometres away.

 

19 Juil 2014, 12:30
Afrique/Africa
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La Vallée des baleines en Égypte

Vallée des baleines, Égypte

Le site Wadi al-Hitan ou la Vallée des Baleines a été inauguré le 10 février 2008 par la première dame d’Égypte, Mme Suzanne Moubarak. Ce site naturel, situé dans le désert occidental de l’Égypte à 150 kilomètre du Caire, un désert vieux de 40 milliions d’années, est le premier inscrit sur la liste du patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO en Égypte et dans la région arabe.

Le site Wadi al-Hitan ou la Vallée des Baleines a été inauguré le 10 février 2008 par la première dame d’Égypte, Mme Suzanne Moubarak. Ce site naturel, situé dans le désert occidental de l’Égypte, est le premier inscrit sur la liste du patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO en Égypte et dans la région arabe. Le ministre de l’Environnement entend développer la région et en faire un musée à ciel ouvert unique.

Wadi Al-Hitan, site unique au monde, témoigne des changements majeurs qui s’inscrivent dans l’histoire de la vie sur Terre : l’évolution des baleines, qui vécurent quelque 40 millions d’années plus tôt. On peut y découvrir très clairement la forme et le mode de vie des cétacés au cours de leur transition entre animaux terrestres et mammifères marins. Le nombre, la concentration et la qualité des fossiles font de Wadi Al-Hitan un site exceptionnel. Il est également facile d’accès et jouit d’un cadre protégé des plus plaisants.

Pour en savoir plus, visitez le site de l’UNESCO : http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1186

Vallée des baleine, Égypte

 

 

 

 

Vallée des baleines, Égypte